Data releases

If you make any scientific use of the publicly available data linked here, we kindly request that you include the following acknowledgement:

LOFAR data products were provided by the LOFAR Surveys Key Science project (LSKSP; https://lofar-surveys.org/) and were derived from observations with the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT). LOFAR (van Haarlem et al. 2013) is the Low Frequency Array designed and constructed by ASTRON. It has observing, data processing, and data storage facilities in several countries, which are owned by various parties (each with their own funding sources), and which are collectively operated by the ILT foundation under a joint scientific policy. The efforts of the LSKSP have benefited from funding from the European Research Council, NOVA, NWO, CNRS-INSU, the SURF Co-operative, the UK Science and Technology Funding Council and the Jülich Supercomputing Centre.
For more details please see our credits page.

LoTSS preliminary

The preliminary LoTSS data release (PDR) is described by Shimwell et al. (2017). It consists of 350 square degrees in the region of the HETDEX Spring field imaged at a resolution of 25 arcsec and a typical noise level less than 0.5 mJy/beam. Over 35,000 sources are detected.

LoTSS Data release 1

LoTSS data release 1 (DR1) is described by Shimwell et al. (2019). It consists of images at the full resolution (6 arcsec) and sensitivity (better than 0.1 mJy/beam) of Dutch LOFAR over 400 square degrees in the region of the HETDEX Spring field. Over 325,000 sources are detected. The data release includes optical counterparts for 71% of the radio sources (Williams et al. 2019) and photometric redshifts for these sources (Duncan et al. 2019).

LoTSS Deep Fields release 1

Please see the separate page describing this release

Long-Baseline Calibrator Survey (LBCS)

Please see the separate page describing this release

LoLSS preliminary data release

Please see the separate page describing this release

LoTSS data release 2

Preparations for a second data release are under way. We aim to release images and radio catalogues for 5,700 square degrees of the northern sky before the end of 2021.